All posts filed under: music journalism

Ida Wenøe: Time Of Ghosts – Gigslutz

The striking, bleakness that opens Ida Wenøe’s ‘Lyla’, the lead single from her new album Time of Ghosts, is breath-taking – a whip of cold wind that sucks the air from your lungs. It is no surprise to learn that Wenøe is Nordic. There is a stripped down, bareness to her sound that seems fitting to the modern perception of what it means to be Nordic. Yet, Wenøe’s dulcet voice offers a warmth and solace despite the melancholy lyrics. Wenøe skilfully combines the sounds of Americana with English folk undertones, all shadowed by the noir-ness of her Nordic background. Time of Ghosts is a journey through a new kind of folk. One that puts to rest the Mumford & Sons pop-edge in favour of a bare honesty. Opening track ‘Changing of the Seasons’ is a soft and pleasant, albeit quite long, introduction to Wenøe’s sound. That particular melding, heavy on the Americana in this instance. Not only sonically but also in its themes; changing seasons, train stations, journeys. Read More…

Johnny Flynn & The Sussex Wit @ St. John Hackney – Gigslutz

It’s hard not to equate a gig to a spiritual experience when it takes place in a church. The acoustics are perfect, the audience is rapt, and the lighting is usually simple, but effective. This was the case when Johnny Flynn & The Sussex Wit took the stage at St. John at Hackney. This is the only time I will mention this hackneyed metaphor, because what Flynn and his band delivered wasn’t divine or heavenly: it was human. Real, down to earth musical talent that just so happened to take place in a holy space. The set list was comprised of old classics and more recent material. It was clear that the die-hard fans had already memorised the words to the newer songs. Yet, even during the most well known ones, the audience sing-along wasn’t as overwhelming as one might expect. Whether out of respect for Flynn, or simply wanting to hear his dulcet singing, not the kid next to you, one can’t be too sure. The few moments where the audience let loose came …

Laura Marling: Semper Femina – Gigslutz

For months the public has been teased with a variety of singles from Laura Marling’s much anticipated Semper Femina. After mounting anticipation, it has arrived, and shattered every expectation. Written during a self-confessed ‘masculine’ time in Marling’s life, the opening track ‘Soothing’ is just that. It is strikingly dissimilar to the singles released so far, and to Marling’s previous work. It is pared down, with blood-thumping percussion. It whets the appetite for Marling’s introspective work, whose title translates to ‘Always Woman’. Read more.. 

Electronic Jungle – CC Magazine

The musical ecosystem is a close and co-dependent world. Its biodiversity depends on very disparate species, mechanisms, and players all working together. There are a lot of ways to become part of this system; a person who interacts with music, whether on a professional or consumption basis, is part of that ecosystem. As a music journalist, I am a professional consumer of music. I make a living and spend most of my free time enjoying, writing about, listening to, and critiquing music in its many forms. But I also spend a lot of time just listening to it because I love it… click image to read full story

Take it From Me – Oh, Comely

I am a professional listener of music. Years of practice in self-isolation, my headphones lost beneath a mass of curls; hidden – during class, on walks, in the locker room at swim practice. Before technology had caught up with my sleuth listening capabilities, I carried a disc-man around in a knit turquoise bag. I could fit three jewel cases inside with it. Each day, three different CDs. One morning, a classmate nicked it off a bench and hid it. When I realised it was gone I burst into tears in front of our entire middle school. Sobbing, I searched for my homeroom teacher to fix this egregious trespass. Only when the disc-man was safely in my hands did the crying stop. I was 12. I should have been embarrassed, I was embarrassed by nearly everything – but I wasn’t this time. Music was everything. Read more…

Laura Marling: Wild Fire – Gigslutz

As Laura Marling’s sonic self continues to evolve, she remains true to her greatest strengths. Newest track ‘Wild Fire’ (taken from the upcoming Semper Femina), builds upon what has always made Marling stand out. Her slightly off-kilter intonation highlights her poetic lyricism, as a wholesomeness underpins the melancholy, and a twinkling, jovial piano accompanies her crooning “do you cry sometimes?”. It is this juxtaposition that Marling has always known how to use so well. Read more…

LIVE: Beans On Toast & Will Varley – Rockwood Music Hall, NYC 12.10.16: Gigslutz

Home is a funny thing. It can transcend the physical, or be so rooted in location and proximity that it is almost inescapable. On Wednesday night, Beans On Toast and Will Varley brought a taste of home to, well, my home. In the tiny stage one area of Rockwood Music Hall in the Lower East Side (my birth place), the two English folk musicians filled the room with their equally unique, disparate, and yet complimentary sounds. It was a breath of fresh English air (which I have adopted as the one that fills my lungs) in the cool October New York City evening. Read more…

The Sound of Empathy: Finding Oneself in Songs – Louder Than War

There is pure rhapsody when we find a bit of ourselves floating in the universe. That moment when, upon completing a Buzzfeed quiz entitled ‘which Game of Thrones Character Are You’ that the answer confirms what we have always known. When our horoscope aligns perfectly. When the vague, haphazard ‘what ifs’ of the universe become specific details to which we go aha, that is me. We seek to find ourselves everywhere but within our own skin. And music is no different. We seek, in each rhyming verse, a kernel of truth about ourselves that makes us feel that we’re not alone. We search for catharsis. Understanding. Empathy. And we find it, by whatever means necessary. At sixteen, I remember clinging to the pole of the M101 bus, hurling itself up first avenue. I always stood. I had my headphones shoved into my ears and Martha and the Vandellas belted out ‘Dancing In The Streets’ and before I knew it, I was crying. It would be more eleven years before I looked back at this moment …

Laura Marling: Short Movie – The Quietus

Laura Marling has just embarked on another branch of her evolution. One expects nothing less from the famed folk singer, who’s personal life has been the centre of her song-writing since her debut album Alas, I Cannot Swim. In the interim between 2013’s Once I Was An Eagle and her newest release Short Movie, Marling has had plenty of fodder. This thirteen-track album sees Marling taking her marked brand of folk spiced up with hints of punk style anger, less subtle than on previous records. Read more…