All posts filed under: politics

The 2017 Diaries: GE17

It’s been a while since I’ve done one of these, but today is the General Election here in the United Kingdom. As an American/EU national living (and working, and paying taxes) here, I can’t vote. But I have paid close attention to this election. And this election is giving me literal chills. Actually, it made me cry. I queued up outside a local public school to vote for Hillary Clinton on a chilly November morning last year. I was ecstatic. Elated. I was voting for the first woman president. We, as a country, were standing on the edge of a wonderful, new, exciting world of possibility. We were about to take a massive turn. And we did, but not for the better. I cried every day for a full week following the US election results. I cried with my friends, I cried with my mentors, I cried with my mom and my uncle. I cried on the bus on the way to work, at work with my coworkers. I cried. A lot. When I relocated …

IT HAPPENED TO ME: I Was Groped at the “Pussy Power” Rally at Trump Tower – XOJane

“I would quite honestly bet a large sum of money that this shrill liberal harpie is talking unmitigated BS.” A few days ago, I broke the cardinal rule of internet journalism: I read the comments. I’m usually good at avoiding that cesspool. As a freelance writer, I know better. But this time it was different. This time, the article wasn’t by me — it was about me. The story this commenter was referring to was my “claim” that I had been groped at a rally outside Trump Tower on Tuesday, October 19. As I read the full comment, I felt my heart beginning to slam against my chest. I don’t mind being called a liberal harpy, or shrill. (Though, if the commenter knew me, they’d know my voice is actually fairly deep.) What enraged me was the ease with which my claim, my story, my voice, was dismissed. I can’t quite start off my story by saying I was “minding my own business,” which is what a lot of my friends who’ve been groped can …

Sophie Walker and WE Party: London Mayoral Hustings – Evening Standard

The mayoral hustings offered Sophie Walker, the Women’s Equality Party candidate, a chance to step into a public forum and she showed that she sees London from a different point of view. Women are half of the population, and within that we are also made up of minorities, so I think Ms Walker could have shown support for intersectionality (the study of overlapping social identities). This was implied in her answers, such as when she discussed how transport needs to be user-friendly for mothers who may not own cars or when she spoke about the pay gap — including women who work part-time because they can’t afford childcare. These undertones of inclusivity are a step in the right direction, and Ms Walker needs to address the needs of specific women for her rhetoric to turn into policy. Women are made up of many subgroups and her participation last night showed her astute understanding of this. When she said “the WEP will make London better for everyone”, I think she truly meant it. Originally Published in the …

#Manterrupting is Real, and it Happens on the 253 Bus to Hackney Central

We all know buses are strange places, where strange things happen. No matter what city you live in, this seems to hold water (at least, my experience in life has taught me this, unless of course it’s raining really hard. I’ve been in leaky busses…) I also love using the bus – I find it a lot nicer than hurling through a dark tunnel in a stuffy underground carriage. For city commuters, there is an unwritten code of behaviour (don’t lean against the poles, don’t put your bags in an empty seat, let the pregnant lady or elderly man with gout sit down) but somehow manterrupting hasn’t made it into the rule book. I spent last night at the cinema with my close friend and flatmate Emma. We’ve lived together almost two years, and know a lot about each other’s lives. We share things – from the deeply emotional to politics to what we had for breakfast. Last night, our bus ride home was passed by talking about our lives – our relationships, my visa, her job, how we …

sisterhood: an association, society, or community of women linked by a common interest: fighting the patriarchy!

I count myself lucky in many ways – I grew up in Manhattan, went to the United Nations School, was part of a diverse swim team, and have traveled a fair bit. I get to write about those experiences and, for the most part, I have my voice. I was raised very, very well. I am privileged in many ways. When I was 10 my best friend was Joelle. We spent almost every afternoon at each others apartments. We did our school projects together, rode the bus together, and had dinners with each others families. As we grew, we fell apart – as a lot of kids do – but have managed to retain a friendship via Facebook (we are in different countries, now, so Facebook is one of the only options). She recently posted this on her Facebook: “Feminism is not solely based on gender based oppression. Women of different races, social classes, and sexual orientations are included in this conversation. To be a feminist requires a great deal of fine tuning of what …

Intersectional Feminists Need to Satirise Glamour’s Article, Not Vice’s Male Writers

This week saw a huge blow to the feminist movement in the form of the glamour article that shall not be named. Vice did a really great, harsh take down of the list but it was,  male centred – it literally responded to all 13 tips from the point of view of a man. Vice’s success was in showing that men too are damaged by misogyny, that the list was horrible to both genders. One of many problems is there isn’t (as far as I can find and would love it if someone could find one for me) a corresponding one on what men should do to make women fall hard for them. It is assumed that women are the ones who have to do the wooing, that men will simply have woman falling over themselves in front of them. Another problem is it sterilises a beautiful part of relationships – falling in love with your partner’s passions. Another is it’s horrific gender stereotyping on behalf of all human beings. After the vitriol thrown at them, Glamour issued a statement: And, Now, …

When Girls Meet World Who Cares How They Speak?

Yesterday I saw an article about Mr. Turner’s reappearance on the Boy Meets World spin-off, Girl Meets World. Any true BMW fan knows about the sequel, featuring cameos galore, but I wondered if any of us actually watched it. So I did – and despite the laugh track and unbearably cheesy tween acting, I saw a really beautiful show. I was lucky enough to grow up watching shows like Clarissa Explains it All, Sister Sister, and My So Called Life – all shows about women growing up, accepting their bodies and themselves, and finding their place in the world. I’m glad to see the tradition is being carried on with GMW. While it could do with a hell of a lot of diversification, it tackles other issues well. From Cory’s public takedown of his daughter’s cultural appropriation (which in itself is her attempt at finding who she is), to Topanga’s kick-ass lawyerly skills, to their daughter Riley and her bff Maya’s navigating of middle school (not very realistically of course, it is a Disney channel kids show) Girl …