Author: gabriella m geisinger

On Claudia Highbaugh – The Wisdom Daily

I don’t expect Claudia to answer the phone, so when her voice crackles through the speaker, I rush quickly out of my office to the balcony, stepping into the frigid October afternoon. I’m in London, and when Claudia says hello her voice is heavy with sleep. It’s only 8am on the east coast. I’ve called to ask her if there’s anything she wants me to leave out in this piece I’m writing – “about you – about us,” I vaguely explain. “Write whatever you want. I trust you,” Claudia says. “Famous last words!” Her laugh, which is more like a giggle, is infectious. She laughs like a woman unencumbered, and it makes me laugh too. Claudia is excited by the piece, though not because she is its subject. She pauses thoughtfully, and then says “mentoring is not something we really talk about in higher education. We talk a lot about advisors but not so much about mentors. About someone who sticks with you through it all.” She would know. Claudia Highbaugh is the Dean of …

I’m Gonna Stop You Right There – Book Squad Goals

Overcoming Mansplaining in Gimlet Media’s Homecoming Ten minutes and forty seconds into the first episode of the Homecoming podcast, David Schwimmer deadpans: “Heidi, I’m gonna stop you right there.” It’s a situation that many women have found themselves in countless times — their expert opinions being overridden by mansplainers. In Homecoming, the role of women — in particular, Heidi Bergman — is pivotal, deeply frustrating, and also true to life. In this way, Homecoming is a show that makes the point of view of women a dynamic and realistic one. Read more…

Becoming A Parent’s Parent – Creative Nonfiction Magazine

  In Creative Nonfiction #64: “Adaptation,” writers search for new normals. From the eroding shores of Georgia’s barrier islands to the national parks of Alaska to the suburbs sprawling into the Arizona desert, we try to keep up—personally, politically, scientifically—with our rapidly changing world. Plus, how other forms, including performance art and handiwork, are influencing creative nonfiction; memoirs by daughter-caretakers; Beth Ann Fennelly writes “micro-memoir”; Nicole Walker sees the braided essay as a form of political resistance; tiny truths; and more. Order a single issue or subscribe today. All new subscriptions start with CNF #64.